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Click on a thumbnail picture below to see the full size version. 78 Entries.
Thursday, January 3 View Page
Five variable, 36 seed trial: Seed tray Columns: bleach or h202 or water soak Seed tray Rows: of garden soil vs seed starting mix. Result: 33/36 germinated, 1 fail in bleach/seed starting mix 1 fail in bleach/garden soil 1 fail in water/garden soil These results may or may not be significant, clearly not highly significant. The main takeaway is that the fizzing observed from the H202 seeds was clearly not harmful to the seed as they performed the best in this trial, regardless of the medium used, perfect germination (12/12). Method: warm water, 10 min, half tsp per quart bleach, half tsp. per quart, 30% h202. Seeds were weighed prior to planting. Lightweight seeds, below germination threshold, were not used. All seeds were from the same cross (407 Est).
Thursday, January 3 View Page
There's a few small things worthy of note here. There is a cucurbita plant in the lettuce which shows a severe deficiency. I don't know the exact cause. I believe with some certainty that it is ph/calcium related. I corrected with calcium towards 7.0 and the next leaf shows healthy growth and color. (I also boosted transpiration by adding a fan.) The deficiency in the older leaf has not corrected itself. I've read that sometimes the less mobile nutrients, when corrected, will improve the new growth but won't fix the deficiency symptoms in the older leaves. That seems to be the case here. Planting multiple species can give a good indication of soil nutrients/ health. Some plants show deficiencies, others will simply grow slower. Tomato sprout here is off to a slow start... I believe a sterile seedling mix with myco could give a faster start. The advantage of using my own soil is I can learn about my soil problems. The lights wilt the lettuce at full strength... I'm having to reduce the lights down. I was wrong in my posts last year the white LED is 150 real watts not 300-500, it may only be equivalent to 750 watts in halogen. Both lights together @ 12" is too much for the lettuce (1650 equivalent.). 1050-1350 seems good. They would probably also grow fine at 900. Without a laboratory with good quality testing equipment, I will instead rely on the lettuce to tell me when I've reached "full sun".
Thursday, January 3 View Page
Where I live: The mountain at the end of the glen. I want to post one more thing about the cucurbit growing in the lettuce. The soil tested very high in nitrogen, which would interfere with calcium uptake. Specifically, probably ammonium pellets. (Ammonium interferes the most.) The roots probably grew into an undissolved ammonium pellet and, I don't think they can regulate the uptake of it, so it binged on ammonium. I want to move away from pelletized fertilizers towards powders, soluble, or organic fertilizers because the root uptake from an undissolved pellet can be very high/excessive.
Thursday, January 3 View Page
One more mountain pic, and then I'll be getting serious about growing a big pumpkin.
Monday, January 7 View Page
I have been thinking a lot lately about really good soil. (That's why I am posting all over the place on bp recently... Sorry if it's excessive, there's a lot I need to figure out. There is a lot I need to get done. I'm really wanting a big improvement this year. Here, the soil in this area is protected by hay. It was not well protected in the past. This was an over-grazed & over-trodden pasture. I'm racking my brain trying to think how to turn this into a pumpkin utopia... Possibly this area will not get used at all. If I grow any large tomatoes, it will likely be here. This area is 3600 feet... but partially shaded around the edges. Fortunately I'm on the south side of the trees, they reduce the light from the sky a lot... but they block the wind nicely. I'm searching for a high and low for a eureka moment... How to deal with all the problems... How to deal with all the problems...
Monday, January 7 View Page
). There's the missing punctuation lol. Forgive all my mistakes... many more to follow. Anyhow I'm at the same elevation as mobeymike 2106 lbs and way lower than cojoe 1685.5 (is that about 2400 at sea level?)... No excuses for me. But Mr. Daletas and Mr. Holland are at about 150 ft or less so no excuses for them... Either. Wait a sec, I have a new text message from Steve. Let me check it... He says, "Willemijns was grown below sea level" Ok, well, looks like the excuses are rolling in already... Ha ha. (Why can't I joke a little...) Back to being serious. I think 1500-1600 would be a very good result for me. That's what I hope to achieve. BTW, when I was working at the fair booth someone asked if they could grow a pumpkin at their elevation. My memory is getting worse but I knew the Colorado record. I think they told me they were from Colorado. Well it hadn't occurred to them that anybody from Colorado would know such a fact, much less someone a few states away. Normal to us... Very oddball to anyone who actually is normal. If you love a sport...then you love the stats.
Thursday, January 10 View Page
Less than a week later (photo taken three days ago). Note: I posted a mistake in the recipe used for the soak. I meant 1/2 tsp. per pint not per quart. Not much else to say except that the oxygen in the H2O2 may help the seed grow. The seedling is burning stored energy, it's not creating its own energy. So during this stage, maybe it needs oxygen, just like how we need oxygen to burn energy. I haven't researched this yet though, so don't take my word for it.
Friday, January 11 View Page
Exceptionally warm weather. To not freeze on a clear night in the middle of January... Is abnormal. I may get important patch work done this weekend?
Saturday, January 12 View Page
Burned the straw off two of the patches. The ground is still very cold and wet but I am trying for an early tart. No clue what I am doing. Also spread calcium hydroxide. It can work like magic on the acid soil here. I think I have seen a real positive affect especially when there is magnesium available too. I need a plan for dealing with perennial weeds. Bindweed and blackberries, specifically. Other than that, I am ready to get some amazing results!
Saturday, January 12 View Page
By early Ssssstart!!! I mean in the ground in early March, possibly. Which is crazy. But I dont mean mid-January... Just to be clear, I AM crazy but not insane. Sorry to disappoint. But... yes, dont be surprised if I get things going here very early. It might not be the best idea for you all I can say is it's a strategy that has worked for me.
Sunday, January 13 View Page
Great weather. 60 degrees today. It could be followed by five months of cold rain, who knows. We had snow on the ground the entire month of February two years ago. This is the least amount of 'winter' I've ever seen... fall to spring, with only a couple weeks of winter? So confusing. Is winter over? Has it not yet begun? I do not know. Feels like spring... so I guess winter is over!
Tuesday, January 15 View Page
Tomato update. Two true leaves on the 5.04, working on third. (Where is it????) I guess it might set a tomato by March... Looks healthy so far. Picking a medium sized salad every few days! No slugs or bugs. The soil freeze worked.
Tuesday, January 15 View Page
This is the setup for growing the lettuce. (Eventually the tomato will be the dominant plant and grow above the lettuce). Working well... It's a seven gallon plastic storage bin with some small drain holes. The lid of the storage bin is working well as a tray to collect any extra water. It takes a lot of water to grow all this lettuce, about a gallon per day. I water every other day or so.
Tuesday, January 15 View Page
The pic for the previous post. The photo at the top is my great grandfather who grew maxima squash commercially (for pie or baby food?)
Friday, January 18 View Page
Earthworm population is getting high in the 900 ft patch there are well over 100 worms per square foot... They are helping a lot the soil is still dense but its not totally compacted. It was dense. It was like cold cheese. Now its like Swiss cheese. Dense but porous at the same time.
Sunday, January 20 View Page
HERE'S A CRAZY IDEA: Use the seed bag as a grow bag. (It might have the seed label on it already)... The tap roots reached the bottoms of the bags today... Today was 6 days after planting. It's a temporary home... the seedlings could be divided and reported after tearing/cutting the plastic away. It's kinda convenient... if you are in a hurry to get your seeds into dirt!
Sunday, January 20 View Page
Another crazy idea! Grocery sack method: I put cardboard in the bottom, then I loaded this paper sack up with wet dirt. The plastic bags, doubled or tripled, are strong enough to pick this plant up. The paper sacks can be peeled away at planting time and the plastic slid out from under, with the cardboard helping. The paper sacks will be weak but they are supposed to act like a big peat pot and allow the roots to grow into a friendly barrier. All & all the goal is to get a bigger plant with more roots but still be able to transplant it outside, without bending or breaking even a single root. The paper bags hold 5-6 gallons of dirt, they're shorter than a 5 gal bucket but slightly wider. The cardboard can either stay or be removed, if it stays it will get eaten by worms it'll soon be soft enough the roots will go through it. Hard to explain. I'll post again in a week when I do the test planting. Planting a pumpkin February 1st...??? It's gonna have to be a really lucky plant with that planting date! We did have one year that did not freeze beyond February, but the odds of that must be 50-1 against. Trying these new tricks now so I will be ready. If you've been on the planet awhile, you have no doubt learned that new things always must be tested first. Going good so far...!
Sunday, January 20 View Page
The pumpkins at the bottom show good stages for transplanting... The scissors are for scale. Middle: The half gallon pot (although this might be called a gallon by some nurseries) is about 6" wide by 7 or so deep. I like these, but the roots are at the bottom at the 1st leaf stage. It's a good size to use though. Left: this is a 9" pot x 9" tall or so I would say about 2 gallons the nurseries might call it 2.5 gallons. In this one, multiple roots have reached the bottom edge by 2nd leaf stage. In other words, neither of these plants is root bound yet. Unfortunately, for the rootball to not break apart, they do need to be a little bit root bound. But other than that, now would be an optimal time to transplant these two. Right: Well this is the one in the paper grocery sack, and it has a huge amount of soil so I will let it get to 3 leaves before checking the root development. I think that @ 3-4 leaves it will show moderate rooting throughout its soil, extending to the bottom edges of the bag. ...So this setup might give the plant another week of growth. I'm pretty excited about this. A very early start with a very big plant... I would really like to reach the podium at the late summer fair, again. Will an early grow, with a big plant, make a good result?
Sunday, January 20 View Page
The craziest of all: A round bale of hay, dropped in the ground on its side. I threw all kinds of garbage onto the bale like miracle grow and blood meal. Then I piled dirt on top. The dirt one foot above the bale was 120 degrees in December around Christmas... Now it's down to 73 degrees. This project is not something I wanted to post other than to humor you and give you something to think about. If I had only thought put up some plastic around there I could have had a redneck, electricity-free sauna. (With an ammonia smell that would knock you over!). It's my self-appointed job to keep you amused in the middle of winter... Well, even supposing it works and grows a huge pumpkin, it's so much work. It's not a fit for my goal of doing things in an "effort-sustainable" manner. I probably will never try this again.
Wednesday, January 23 View Page
This is a 1/4 inch or less pumpkin stem section viewed through a microscope. There is a mite, which is exceedingly tiny. There were many of these, and only one was large enough to be seen by the naked eye... Far smaller than a spider mite. I guess they came from the soil. Some of the soil I used was not frozen, but perhaps there could have been eggs or perhaps they can survive freezing. Anyhow... I had no clue about the hordes and never would have... if it wasn't for cutting some plants up to study the xylem and phloem... these guys we're an unexpected surprise. Some of the bundles of xylem and phloem are visible here also.
Friday, January 25 View Page
Itís crazy but there is so much info in a search for ďxylem phloem fruit developmentĒ I am going to devote an entire day to study just this one thing. I like minimizing time and effort... but I think I have no choice... 24 hours from now this is a topic I will understand. Full throttle crashing my brain into it, yeah baby, this is how I like to roll... itís late January Iím low on vitamin D here and sanity is out the window! Woo hoo!!! Lol... hit the fast forward to March please.
Sunday, January 27 View Page
Anna and one of her tomato plants, late May, last year. Two days after this picture was taken she decided she couldnít handle living with me anymore. Oof. Another oof... Iím sure Iím at $1000 invested so far this year, now. Ouch. All on a gamble. It will likely take double that to get me through the season. Whether Iím successful or not, I think this hobby will be headed to the back burner next year. Next year is going to all be about being economical. Next year... $200. One ĎWow pakí helped each of her tomato plants, like the one pictured here, btw. Mulch water and miracle grow, too. The only thing she did wrong was let them get root bound they should have been planted in the garden two or three weeks prior to this photo. Other than not getting them in the ground on time, Iím 100% going to be stealing from her playbook. She also had some early aphid problems, and the aphids were transmitting viruses. No snow yet this year and very mild weather again.
Sunday, January 27 View Page
Great weather in the Pacific Northwest so it's planting time!
Sunday, January 27 View Page
...just kidding. It's test planting time, though, ...grocery bag method.
Sunday, January 27 View Page
Plastic slid out from under the paper and cardboard without much trouble. The paper was rotting. Root development was poor but one root can be seen emerging. Most roots were 1-5 deep they did not grow deeper. Poor soil conditions for root development (I think the soil was overly wet and anaerobic, also the third leaf shows nutrient issues) for but other than that, the timing @ 3 true leaves was appropriate. The plant would benefit, during transplanting, from staking. Using the entire depth of full size paper grocery bag might not provide much benefit, because the roots appear to mostly want to spread laterally... I expect the plant would not use the entire depth until after being significantly restricted by the width. But even half full, a large paper grocery bag can hold 3-4 gallons.
Sunday, January 27 View Page
Successful. This one had two layers of cardboard. One is shown off to the side. This soil was very sticky so (although there were few roots) there was not much risk of the rootball breaking apart. I will probably continue to use two layers of cardboard under the plant, as a precaution, to give stability when handling the plant. Hopefully in a month I will be trying all of this again, but with looser soil with more calcium, for hopefully a bigger, healthier plant. I'll also stake it somehow before it reaches full size, or just let the sides of the bag hold the leaves up during transplanting until the plant is better supported.
Monday, January 28 View Page
Has to be the warmest January on record here. Just thought Iíd document this.
Wednesday, January 30 View Page
Significantly fewer worms in an area that got thoroughly tilled at the end of June last year. 5 worms in a quantity dirt that would contain 100 elsewhere. Mulch was the same. Heavy mulch, just like the other areas. Also the tilth is very different in various areas. These are things I never would have paid attention to in the past. Now, Iím trying to learn and make better decisions... The worms do seem to add a lot of gumminess to the soil.
Thursday, January 31 View Page
Wikipedia: ďInvestigations in the United States show that fresh earthworm casts are five times richer in available nitrogen, seven times richer in available phosphates, and 11 times richer in available potassium than the surrounding upper 6 inches (150 mm) of soil. In conditions where humus is plentiful, the weight of casts produced may be greater than 4.5 kg (10 lb) per worm per year.[3]Ē The leaves I added last spring were not noticeably beneficial last year. (Despite adding nitrogen to offset their decomposition). But maybe thatís because the worms didnít digest them sufficiently. Maybe they are digested now. When I consider the amount of worms that a cubic foot of soil can contain, the amount of castings could be truckloads per year. Maybe when they say feed the soil, they really mean feed the worms. I can see that if, rather than rototill, I simply keep the worms well fed... they can do the equivalent amount of work. Should I mow and spread clippings more, and till less? The only problem with no-till is the earthworm tunnels probably provide habitat for various plant and root eating bugs. But nutritionally, it looks like a better vegetable cropping system. So how can I get the best of both worlds?
Saturday, February 2 View Page
Another test. Testing a few things. Seed weight. Seed coat deformities. And position, right or left hand edge down.
Saturday, February 2 View Page
A poor start (the dirt is not sterile). Way up in the right hand the smallest seed germinates first! The seed weights increase in a diamond pattern from lower left to upper right. From .67 to .17 grams. The seed weighing .17 grams was viable and it was the first to fully sprout. But some others are not far behind.
Saturday, February 2 View Page
Looking better @ 9 days old. Interesting thing is, the smallest seed had equal vigor, as far as coming up quickly, but now it's clearly a much smaller plant and its (hopelessly?) behind. I examined the roots, and the full seeds, (the heavier ones) as expected, had more robust root systems. I previously had assumed that the smaller seeds would be slower to germinate. That was the most unexpected result in this trial. Direction (which edge went down) did not matter, which was also unexpected. Overall, the conclusion once again, is the heavy (fullest) seeds will make bigger healthier plants, at least initially. Lastly, no noticeable problems arose with the seeds which had deformed seed coats. Notably, the one seed with a crack going through the seed coat did rot, however. Cracked seeds need special care. That's a 'whole nother topic'...
Saturday, February 2 View Page
Tomato in lettuce. I know there's a tiny bud and I bet it's a mega. Not that it matters... I doubt I can get a mega to its full potential in this limited environment. Have same trouble as last year. Edema I think. Fan 24/7. Lettuce and mini pumpkin plant are sorta happy, tomato is not. Also the tomato is showing some nutritional issue. I love the way photos don't lie. Photos are very useful because the plant issues seem to really show up well. Lettuce growing was a fantastic success, I am at about a medium salad every other day now.
Saturday, February 2 View Page
Lettuce overview. Some other plants in case I want to experiment. Last year one of these nameless medical volunteers got promoted to the best patch... So you never know. It ain't over till it's over... life is always giving second chances! Not every time, but sometimes...
Sunday, February 3 View Page
Footnote: I thought I should mention the seeds in the latest trial were all from Anna's big pumpkin... Same stock the better looking plants were simply from better filled seeds. There are further possibilities for selecting a good plant. What seems logical to me is to compare at least a few plants using your own dirt / at each planting location. I may try planting my own seeds as a backup to my 'obtained' seeds... There is a protection effect in a group because the pests will eat the outer plants first hopefully. So I could plant my own seeds all around the middle plant... Knights around a king. If the plant in the middle fails to be healthy... as a replacement the healthiest one of the surrounding plants will then be a fine choice. For now, thats the best plan I can think of.
Thursday, February 7 View Page
High of 33 or so. Fall spring and then winter, this year. Next pic shows some pruning.
Thursday, February 7 View Page
I tried to leave all the two year wood on this cherry. I will prune it down farther after it bears fruit. Normally I would cut more. Instead, I will prune it down farther in July at the same time I'm harvesting any fruit. I think this idea might work well, it's worth a try. Btw... Fruit size is all about the phloem... That's what I've learned so far. The cherry orchard guys prune every branch 1/3 or 2/3 of the way back so the tree will make larger cherries. They want to concentrate the phloem on fewer numbers of blossoms so the get real big. I can't guarantee good pollination the way they can though! So I'm choosing to leave all the blossoms (on this one, anyhow). I'll post the results in mid July.
Thursday, February 7 View Page
"Weak tip" I saw this last year on some of my outdoor plants. I suspect a potassium deficiency. There is enough nitrogen. It could be lack of boron or some trace nutrient, or phosphorous or sulfur or... well the list goes on. I should have lab tested the plants that did this thing last year. The leaves show a somewhat gradual fading from what looks like excess nitrogen in the center to more yellow green around the edge. I believe it is a nutrient issue or ph issue, not a light or watering issue. Please send me an email if it's obvious to you... thank you.
Thursday, February 7 View Page
Another pic.
Saturday, February 9 View Page
Change in weather.
Saturday, February 9 View Page
This might become my daughters pumpkin diary. She wants to grow big. I might drop my own pumpkin ambitions and just help her. In which case, we will be following Joel Holland methods. And her sister wants to grow one too. Hopefully her mom will help her grow a tomato because I don't know if I can coach more than one future pumpkin grower. I get stuff done by cutting corners. If I'm helping someone else learn via the Joel Holland videos there won't be any more cutting corners. Instead of cutting corners... more likely we will be filing the edges of her seeds.
Saturday, February 9 View Page
My companion/ helper. This cat adopted me she is a good companion sometimes she acts more like a dog than a cat. I don't know if she can catch a mouse but she seems interested in hunting. So if she can't catch them, perhaps she scares them away.
Saturday, February 9 View Page
Yet another test. This one shows best position to plant a seed is lying flat. 6/6 up, with no leaf damage. Uniform seed was used. This result makes sense, because in nature, a flat object will most likely lie on its side. So they'd better know how to sprout from this position. FYI, The third row here is the seeds that were laid flat. Some others had leaf damage, and overall all the other rows are a bit slower. Point-down seeds like to keep the seed coat on. Testing the boundaries of traditional pumpkin growing methods! In a very small way.
Saturday, February 9 View Page
That's what they looked like. There is also a checkerboard of myco, but I don't think that any of the myco treatment differences will show up another week or two, if at all. Maybe one or two more tests before the actual growing season begins...
Monday, February 11 View Page
Mikkal has got me thinking about tomato watering. Meanwhile though my tomato is in poor health. The lettuce is doing ok and the mini squash plant is ok. The good news is there is a very worthy bud on it but the plant as a whole is a disaster. The bud looks mega bigger than a triple and not a ribbon. Yet another good domingo bud... this was my 5.04 so maybe it bred true to its 8.22 parent... But other than that its a fail. Lettuce and tomatoes don't like the same growing conditions. Purslane and a tomato might work ok together... Oh well.
Monday, February 11 View Page
Maybe the best way to irrigate tomatoes would be overhead up until blossom then switch to flood. Perhaps even the first bit of time after blossom could still be done overhead. After that flood irrigation with warm or calcium fortified water? But tomatoes are well suited to drip irrigation also. If the water is cold thats ok as long as its not the entire root zone. Cold water on the entire root zone equals calcium issues. They like the low soil moisture and cool nights I think so in this regard the pacific northwest is perfect... yet most home gardeners struggle here probably because of lack of sun or 80 degree days or having the wrong soil fertility--which is normal here after it rains all winter.
Tuesday, February 12 View Page
Well this is what I get for thinking spring was here. A couple branches broke shortly after I took this picture. Power is out. Running wood stove. 12" here. It's cast iron w/flat top so I can cook on it. Spread 50 lb of perfection k-special fertilizer. 12-12-28 with micros and cheap. Didn't quite cover everything. Thought the snow would show if I was spreading it evenly, but it turns out the snow surface has dips and curves and it didn't end up distributed better.
Tuesday, February 12 View Page
Apple tree, again. Sick of snow yet? The tree in the previous picture is a Sitka spruce. The branches are tremendously strong. It's known to be the strongest commercial softwood. It was used to build the "Spruce Goose"... One of Howard Hughes great accomplishments. And I read that our modern Howard Hughes... Elon Musk, is building his Mars spaceship out of stainless steel. The ordinary can become amazing (in the right hands!).
Sunday, February 17 View Page
I just realized a strategy I could use to help make good crosses. Last year I planted three Radach seeds in one hill. They performed well and I used at least two as pollinators. However, despite being in most ways a uniformly good seed there ended up being some potentially important differences in the plants. And the only way to tell if the differences might be genetic is to have all three plants growing out of the same hill...otherwise all of the differences may be ascribed to location. So my idea for 2019 is to have my pollinator plants in the same hill so I can compare them as they grow. I can then use them for pollinations and later in the year I can look at them and judge which was the best plant overall so I can better know which of the crosses I made are ones I may want to grow again. I can still try for 1000 lbs with three in one hill. Might do 2005 Haist 1625 Gantner and 2528 for use as pollinators. I think this would make an interesting comparison of these plant's traits. Perhaps I should squeeze in a fourth plant just for the sake of comparison.
Sunday, February 17 View Page
Looks like someone hasn't been eating their veggies! Tomato bud isn't open. Its a mega, but the plant has had too many root and leaf issues, from less than ideal growing conditions. I will have to be more careful...
Sunday, February 17 View Page
In these I tried common biological products that are supposed to help with roots. Myco and tricho. Two control plants were not treated. Out of the four best developed plants, 1/4 was myco, 1/4 was tricho, and 2/2 on control... Neither used. I also added oat seeds to see if I could tell a difference. I see nothing I can attribute to the biologicals. I'm beginning to suspect that the biologicals may not have much affect, if the soil is already highly biological, and reasonably healthy. Under some conditions, it may not result in a notable benefit to add these??? It might be expensive to try to push soil biology one way or the other with these, unless it's a sterile system to begin with? This wasn't the best test. I can say I did used uniformly mixed garden dirt, and the seeds were uniform, but I may not have applied the biologicals optimally or the ph could be an issue, etc, etc. I only post these results to inspire growers to experiment with your own dirt and your own products, not at all trying to discourage or endorse any product based on one test. The results in this case the results were not conclusive, and that is why you should test the products you're using. Try to get the variables like seed cross and seed weight the same, and the soil moisture the same, and temperature/ location within the germination chamber evened out so the results reflect only the variables you want to test.
Sunday, February 17 View Page
Tomato graft pictures I promised. Next two are also graft pictures.
Sunday, February 17 View Page
These stems were close to the same size when grafted. Now the added stem is smaller, but it did graft in... I could cut the large stem and the plant might struggle a bit as it begins to grow on just the smaller stem. Really I would like a much better method, a better result than this, because its going to slow the canopy down to remove 3/4 of the roots.
Sunday, February 17 View Page
Waxed dental floss. If you think this looks like a first time attempt to graft tomatoes, you are correct!
Tuesday, February 19 View Page
Squash bloom, tomato bud. (Hard to see. Vibrating it now... probably a bit early.) Not expecting more than 3 oz. Nice size bud though if it was on a normal healthy plant outside... Maybe it would hit 4 or 5 lbs.
Tuesday, February 19 View Page
Squash flower looked big. Turns out it has eight sepals. Five is normal. This is a male flower, but if it was a female AG this would make quite a pumpkin. I've found sepals corresponds to ribs. And theoretically if the baby pumpkin had six more ribs (two extra ribs for each extra sepal... eight sepals equals 16 ribs, instead of the usual 10)... It could achieve an extra 60% larger weight. This is something competitive growers might want to pay attention to. This probably holds true for field kins melons, watermelons, and marrows.
Tuesday, February 19 View Page
Normal five sepal bud. Sepals are the green fingery parts, the lowest/outermost part of the flower... Another part of the flower, the stigma lobes inside the flower, corresponds to ovaries, which are the hollow female part of the pumpkin that contains the seeds. So more lobes does not equal more weight, but they can affect the shape of the pumpkin. And more lobes could correspond to more seeds.
Friday, February 22 View Page
795.5 grown blossom-down. Got 3rd place in Puyallup... We are so cool. My kids are angels, which is too bad... cuz if they were really bad kids maybe their moms would want me to see them more! Moms are perfectly happy... collecting child support. Everyone is happy I guess... Pollinated indoor tomato today... I think I saw pollen flying. 27 days left so it should be halfway done growing. Should have started sooner. Oh well I'm happy that I tried.
Monday, February 25 View Page
2005 Haist vs 186 Radach started today. Not recommending an ultra early start just trying it myself to see how it goes. Will require artificial light, heat, and double layer plastic cover. And unless I do everything else with some skill it wont amount to much. Would like to get up to 1200+ by end of August. The 186 is guaranteed orange with good potential to make a big healthy plant. The seed weights are very close. The Radach is one year older. I might start some others soon as extra backups but thats it for this evening.
Monday, February 25 View Page
1484.5 Tobeck and 38 Peine 1836 Tobeck x 2002 Tobeck (3) into the next pot. Going with all 3 seeds because they are woefully light maybe one will pop. Thanks for the seeds Greg.
Wednesday, February 27 View Page
No skimping on backups... 795.5 Peggy 143 Ms Warty and my 274 est (1774.5 Carter x 1992.5 Vincent) are joining the competition 2 days behind the others except little Peggys were in a paper towel 2 days ago but 3 are now in dirt. Mid to late May pollination hopefully...
Saturday, March 2 View Page
Indoor tomato. Probably a six pounder under ideal conditions... but the plant is suffering still. It only has a few immature leaves supporting this tomato. 19 days left... So... 6 oz??? Fun, fun, fun.
Saturday, March 2 View Page
Myco plants are now as good or better than control plants. Tricho plants seem to be lagging. Wish I had azos here also. Not scientific... so consider my results while inhaling plenty of fresh air. They're not meant to be definitive results for every situation and the statistical value of these observations is very low.
Saturday, March 2 View Page
186 Radach is first to pop. (Despite being a year older!) Pic @ 3.5 days after start of initial soak. If the 2005 Haist isn't an amazing plant, it will be fun to grow Radach's 186 again.
Saturday, March 2 View Page
Cabbage croaked and Kale did too. Snow still on the ground and still 6" deep or so in the shade. Year-round gardening works until one of these bad weather events. ...Which do happen most years. So what's the point of even trying? (At least the aphids got killed too?)
Saturday, March 2 View Page
Oops probably Radach pic is @ 4 1/2 days not 3 1/2. So... Germination is proceeding normally, nothing exciting. I am liking starting multiples per pot with the tips pointing inward. The cotyledons may overlap but I can blast them with enough light to make up for this. I'd rather have them compete and pick the best plant later. I can make up for a less-than-perfect start later as long as it's still a healthy start. Stocky plants are awesome, but if they compete early and get a little less stocky, they'll lay down easier. A totally non-conventional (so you might assume bad?) starting method.
Monday, March 4 View Page
Got down to 15 degrees last night. Hopefully thats it for real winter weather. Winter did come and as far as I am concerned as of this morning it has overstayed its welcome.
Saturday, March 9 View Page
Hobby level start to my season... 186 Radach = Normal leaf 2005 Haist on right = Curled leaf too much ammonium/ammonical nitrogen. Not enough calcium, temps too high and transpiration too low. ...That's the culprit here. I did not add ammonium. I just used a potting mix that contained too much. The other plant is one of my seeds.
Tuesday, March 12 View Page
Ending my tomato grow. 1/2 oz only 26 grams.
Tuesday, March 12 View Page
Going dark here to be in solidarity with the victims of U.S. imperialism in Venezuela. Our empire breaks these commandments: "Thou shalt not steal". "Thou shalt not bear false witness". I'm going to stand up to these lying stealing thugs on Wall Street because its Gods commandment... however I can. Its Gods commandment, even if I have to switch my own vote to a fringy socialist candidate, I will. Capitalism is great but Wall Street has turned it into a means towards slavery and abuse. They've turned capitalism into imperialism. The oil wealth stolen from Venezuela will pay for next great immoral war, one in which your kids may be killed or their souls destroyed. The cycle will continue until we stand up loudly against our thuggish capitalists on Wall Street. There are also high-tech "bullionaires" and defense department bullies that we must stand up to. These people are not fit to have so much wealth and power. The truth will set us free. That's the good news... but only once we refuse to bear both external and internalized lies. Can you see this: There is a double meaning in "Do not bear false witness" it means dont lie... It also means if we see a lie, dont put up with it. The truth is Bolton and Rubio are greedy bullies and we are shooting ourselves in the foot to let Wall Street win in Venezuela because Wall Street is already winning via inflation and via your mortgage and simply printing money out of thin air. Why do they need to win more than that. Maybe we, the citizens of the world, will dump the Federal Reserve banking system on its head... because their own corruption is too excessive. They will keep winning and winning, but suely the day is coming that all the slaves will revolt and they will lose. If you don't want socialism then stand up for FAIR capitalism. Unfair (money printing plus warfare) capitalism destroys true capitalism. Unfair capitalism is imperialism. The last global empire used to be London, England. Now its Tel Aviv and San Francisco and New York. Lies destroy justice. Lewis County, where I live, is the Venezuela of the new global order... Full of exploited impoverished people with no one who cares and no one to lead them. Who will we vote for? Will we even have a choice? A candidate who will really stand up for us?? Won't any such candidate be destroyed by the imperialist media as anti-semitic or anti-gay etc. etc... The only people who are allowed to run for office are the ones who will trade away your wealth, and sell you like slaves. Guiado comes across as a glorified slave trader. He promises that the conditions in prison are better than those in the real world. Well, that may be true in the short term. How long will you or I be free when 95% of the U.S. is NOT protesting... its just too hard to be the one sheep that fights back. But if we do try follow Gods commandments there is something better in store; something better than endless sin. We can ha
Tuesday, March 12 View Page
We can have more prosperity if we do not steal, lie and bear the lies of others. Perhaps we collectively covet the sovereignty of our international neighbors, because we have lost own, or we never had it to begin with, or because we are slacking in our own defence of our own sovereignty. China and Russia love that we are messing with Venezuela and not paying attention to our own sovereignty... They are laughing at us right now aren't they? I am going to rebuild this county myself. And by I... I mean we... if anyone else is with me. If Venezuela doesnt have power because of CIA/mossad tyranny... then I dont have power either. Tired of all the lies. Can I build a truthful life? I wonder, because look at this turd of a human... I have a long, long ways to go. Totally ill... I am a victim of the war on all of us, and of my own sins too... and I look like it. Hopefully this changes henceforth.
Tuesday, March 12 View Page
Day one after being computer hacked by the imperialists... I will see if I can last longer than Venezuela or Gaza. Gaza also suffers from a lack of electricity due to an overly powerful neighbor. Tomorrow: making emergency candles with old beeswax. These few candles wont last long. Processing it using propane as a heat source. Phone can still charge ... but in a real outage I would not be able to post we dont even have automatic generators on our cell towers out here. All I can say so far is... I would be MAD AS HELL if I was a freedom loving Venezuelan... Its no wonder we are removing our embassy personel. If law and order falls apart that embassy is gonna get roasty-toasty. US media is backtracking and painting Guiado as less of a freak. I guess it sounded a little too CIA for him to self appoint himself president. Bing search engine says Maduro is the former president. Well thats not awkward.. lol. Maduro is president of the Bolivaran Republic of Venezuela. And Guiado is the president of the "U.S. Colony of Venezuela." This should be interesting to see. Its psychologically interesting... Lets see if we can rape Venezuela and get away with it. And still have our reputation of being the "land of the free and brave". Who knows, maybe I will still grow a pumpkin... if I can get a generator to run my pump off propane economically :) Probably not. Victims of imperialism dont grow pumpkins. I think I will devote my life to something more meaningful like finding and exposing tyrants. But I will try to keep my posts relevant to "growing pumpkins during a civil war/under foreign tyranny."
Thursday, March 14 View Page
Heating ground with storm debris for my anti-imperialism pumpkin protest. I dont know if this works as well as soil cables but I know i can put a plant into 38 degree dirt.
Thursday, March 14 View Page
Illuminati aliens leave their junk behind... Awesome :) But they took their fancy purple grow light so this year... Candle power. 1 candlepower = 80-100 watts like a lightbulb should raise the temps 5-10 degrees. No grow light might mean pumpkin plant does not grow... But it may be sufficiently warm to grow. Beeswax, since parafin would be too toxic.
Thursday, March 14 View Page
Here is a peak inside. This is a plant that was a little too good to discard. So one of my test tube babies makes the cut again... The plants I intended to grow are now backup plants.
Thursday, March 14 View Page
*I meant I CANT put a plant into 38 degree dirt. I could but what would be the point... The roots could not grow.
Thursday, March 14 View Page
Last bit of snow hopefully. All pics from today except the fire pic was last night. I can look back later at these posts & see. Hard to imagine getting an earlier start. Definitely ahead of last year!!! :)
Friday, March 15 View Page
Imperialists win... Oddly I do not have a whole house breaker switch. So thats sobering. If the war on our own society ever gets real... I'm back to the stone age. I cant even go to solar or a generator for temporary/partial power supply. I doubt the US will ever be subjected but if it is...I will certainly be a weak link. Gaza and Venezuela will hopefully win the imperialist wars being waged against them but as for me, I was easily defeated. I will finally get to mailing out tomato seeds now... maybe...

 

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