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Subject:  soil ammendments

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Slim

Whitehall Montana

Have any growers tried using sugar beet shreds in there patches?It is the end run through the sugar beet plant,is dried and shredded for hourse feed.There is no additives at all.I know at least 1 fertilizer company that makes it into a very low NPK fertilizer.Its 10.00 a bag at the feed store.

1/12/2015 5:51:29 PM

Ludwig Ammer

Eurasia

Hi Slim, I only use these pellets in the grass silage, because there is some sugar left in that waste of production waste. We have seven 500 liter buckets to fill with the lawn cuttings, and this rich in protein stuff needs sugar for the lactic bacteria.
When I did that sugar beet pulp pellets into the soil of my mother´s greenhouse two years ago, she had no white fly and no bacterial diseases then.
Mineral content of sugar beet pulp pellets is very high, and so we so not need to add trace elements every year.
I come from agriculture and plant nutrition, and so I can say you this: the one thing, sugar beet always needs, is boron! Sugar beet is the culture with the highest B-fertilization of all crops. No boron is washed out with the sugar, all of it goes into the pulp pellets or shreds.
And I as a plant breeder have to spray foliar boron before the flowering of cucurbitaceae every year. And when I bring boron into the soil when spading up my grass silage, this is ideally for the basic supplies of cucurbits.
Since I do many interspecific and even intergeneric crosses, I have to enable pollen to cut into foreign pistils...with a boron surplus!

1/12/2015 6:59:10 PM

Total Posts: 2 Current Server Time: 6/24/2018 1:02:04 PM
 
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